Archive for the category "history"

Granville Street Starwalk and Redesign

Comments 8 by Rebecca Bollwitt

It’s been around since 1994 but does anyone ever really notice it? Passing over the plaques of Dal Richards and Diana Krall this afternoon I was inspired to find out more about Vancouver’s own walk of fame. Photo credit: freedryk on Flickr The Starwalk pays tribute to local musicians, entertainers, producers, actors and radio DJ’s, […]

Goodbye, Mr. Kripps

Comments 6 by Rebecca Bollwitt

It’s as much a fixture of Granville Street as those drunken 19 year-old suburban kids and Bruno Gerussi‘s plaque on the Walk of Fame; Kripps Pharmacy is leaving town, and the famous neon “DRUGS” sign that’s stood there for decades will be taken down. Photo credit: bRONTE dIGITAL on Flickr Recently the famous “Drugs” sign […]

Fort Rodd Hill and Fisgard Lighthouse

Comments 6 by Rebecca Bollwitt

Yesterday we drove around the southernmost tip of Vancouver Island, surveying storm damage from the night before and witnessing towering waves crashing on shore and showering roads and pathways with debris. It was the first big storm of the season and being that we were on the Island, we were pretty concerned about our passage […]

Haunted Vancouver – Scare Me

Comments 8 by Rebecca Bollwitt

I admit, I’m a sucker for a good ghost story. Although I have never experienced any paranormal activity (that I’m aware of) a good chilling tale will put me on alert and make my pulse race. Best way to take in a story about hauntings and messages from beyond the grave? Take the Ghostly Walks […]

The Fabulous Commodore Ballroom

Comments 6 by Rebecca Bollwitt

Update 2011: Billboard has named The Commodore Ballroom one of the Top 10 Most Influential Clubs in North America. Last night we went to see They Might be Giants at the Commodore to round out John‘s Birthday-week celebrations. It was a really great evening and the atmosphere was so relaxed, whimsical and pleasant with TMBG’s […]

The Pen and Sapperton Days

Comments 7 by Rebecca Bollwitt

When I was little we would drive through New Westminster every Sunday and pass the big, intimidating and scary-looking Penitentiary. Its high walls up on the hill above Columbia street over looking the Fraser were dark grey and seemed to span for miles. In 1878, the Government of Canada opened the British Columbia Penitentiary, the […]